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The layout of your browser

Browser Basics: The layout of your browser

Note: All the following information throughout this document will be based on Netscape. We've chosen Netscape for the reason we personally feel it is a better browser and additionally, it's more popular, so it seemed like the natural choice. If you're using an alternative browser, chances are that most of the techniques apply to it as well.

When you start your browser you should see a whole bunch of stuff. The most common components of the browser window are:

  1. The File, Edit, View, etc. menus
  2. Buttons (for example, `Back,' `Forward,' `Home,' `Reload,' etc)
  3. A place for your URL (as in ``Location'' as described above)
  4. The largest area of your browser is the space to display requested webpages.
  5. A status bar (see below for more information on this)

See a screenshot as an example of what a typical browser screen looks like.

You may also notice a scrollbar appear. Your browser will automatically give you a scrollbar when the webpage is too large to fit in one screenful. As with any other program, you can use it to view what's initially hidden.

Buttons

Using the buttons that your browser provides are one of the most important things to learn. Soon enough, you're going to click on a link by accident and end up in a webpage that you didn't want to be in. That's where the Back button comes in. Simply click it once and be taken to your previous page. Give it a try: Take this link and come back when you're done. Remember to use the Back button!

Status Bar

At the bottom edge of the window created for most browsers is an area that the program can use to display messages. Sometimes this is a message created within the web page, somtimes it has to do with where your mouse is positioned. Experiment with it - it can be helpful and even funny at times.



Copyright © 1996, 1997, 1998 Dr. Raj Mehta. All rights reserved.